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PTID1862

One for the future..

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I hate the hyping of children as the next big thing. My nephew is seven and regularly has F***st scouts watching his team. It's ridiculous. You can't really tell if a player is going to make it at 18, what chance do you have at 8? You've no idea how they're going to develop, mentally or physically. Or perhaps they'll get bored of football and develop a passion for music, theatre or engineering?


 


It's also a bad idea putting the idea into a child's head that they are headed for fame and fortune. I remember an American kid (can't remember his name now) who was hyped as the next big thing in the 90s based on some fancy skills, I think a club even paid a multi-million dollar fee for him too. Where is he now?


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He's talented, good control of the ball and he looks set to have a bright future.

I hope he stays grounded because he would go further, he should sign/stay with the biggest local team because that will aid him. Coaches need to teach players that step overs and dribbles don't look 'amazing', there's more to be said about players who can keep the ball closer to their feet. This lad slows it down and watches for the space, whilst the coach stays at 100mph and that makes it look better.

Anyone who shows off doing step overs etc, needs to learn to flicks and other tricks. :P

Talented though.

@Northants Pie what do you think?

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He's talented, good control of the ball and he looks set to have a bright future.

I hope he stays grounded because he would go further, he should sign/stay with the biggest local team because that will aid him. Coaches need to teach players that step overs and dribbles don't look 'amazing', there's more to be said about players who can keep the ball closer to their feet. This lad slows it down and watches for the space, whilst the coach stays at 100mph and that makes it look better.

Anyone who shows off doing step overs etc, needs to learn to flicks and other tricks. :P

Talented though.

@Northants Pie what do you think?

 

He does have extremely good technical skill for a lad so young, over here he would never get on as we are too busy following a coaching manual to do anything different, that's where the problems lies with the national team but the bell ends at the FA will never get past the point that it can't be their fault but that's an issue for another thread.

 

As to where he would be best "schooled", the coaching system in Italy will only aid his technical development, just look at their training drills, ever seen anything like that on a pitch over here? No, nor have I & you most probably never will as it doesn't fit into their so called "master plan". As to the coaches teaching him not to do step-overs etc sorry mate but I completely disagree, there is no better way of allowing talent to prosper than letting it develop in the way it wants to develop, the trick to the best coaches and academies is that they develop each individual talent on its own merits hence why the coach is trying to push the lad to express his ability at speed.

 

In contrast to most I hope he develops his ego further as this will only aid his ability on the pitch, his parents have the ability to keep him grounded in every other way.

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the talent is clearly there and should be left to develop, let the kid just go and play...


 


This looks like one where you would coach it out of him, rather than coach anything into him


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Not that many English boys have that level of talent at that age though. However the rules are tinkered with, technically school children just don't come anywhere near his level.

In saying that though I'm still not sure what the answer is. I've taught many 'good' players of his age, but nothing compares to that. It just seems they have a confidence that we can't instill into our youngsters.

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Not that many English boys have that level of talent at that age though. However the rules are tinkered with, technically school children just don't come anywhere near his level.

In saying that though I'm still not sure what the answer is. I've taught many 'good' players of his age, but nothing compares to that. It just seems they have a confidence that we can't instill into our youngsters.

 

Not very many kids have that amount of talent at that age anywhere in the world I would suspect, I used to coach a lad in the under 8's team I ran that I promise you was better than him, much better than him.

 

Where did he end up? Well his dad like so many in this country was living his own little dreams out through his kid so wouldn't listen to any of the advice he was given, I told & told him not to let the lad go to any pro club until he was 14 as he would have this ability coached out of him, people within the game that I know told him exactly the same, did he listen did he buggery, he took his lad first to Aston Villa and the day they came back from the first training session the dad was in a full Villa tracksuit, then when this didn't work out he then went onto another two pro clubs and all the time his old man was in their full tracksuits, now the lad just messes around on a Sunday in the hangover leagues as he has became so disillusioned with the game, I asked him why and he said that none of the clubs knew what to do with him and were always telling him to do the same thing as all the other kids at his age group

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I hate the hyping of children as the next big thing. My nephew is seven and regularly has F***st scouts watching his team. It's ridiculous. You can't really tell if a player is going to make it at 18, what chance do you have at 8? You've no idea how they're going to develop, mentally or physically. Or perhaps they'll get bored of football and develop a passion for music, theatre or engineering?

 

It's also a bad idea putting the idea into a child's head that they are headed for fame and fortune. I remember an American kid (can't remember his name now) who was hyped as the next big thing in the 90s based on some fancy skills, I think a club even paid a multi-million dollar fee for him too. Where is he now?

I agree youngest should be 14

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